Tag Archives: beer cocktails

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Breakfast In Bed

While beer cocktails may seem like a novel new trend in mixology, using beer in cocktails is not actually a new concept. In fact, the earliest beer cocktails date back to 1695, with the mention of the flip in Oxford’s English Dictionary.

Although rarely seen on a cocktail menu today, a flip is a fantastic way to get into beer cocktails. In its most basic iteration, a flip is simply beer, spirit, and sweetener. Flips can also include egg, and may be served hot or cold.

This flip variation was created by Owen Schmidt, while he was still bartending at the Bayou Oyster Bar and features a combination of amaro and stout. The initial creation utilized a locally brewed oatmeal stout, but any stout that is thick and creamy will do. This drink can easily be used as a starting point to experiment with other amaro/stout combinations. Cheers!

Breakfast In Bed
3 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 1/2 oz Amaro Abano
1 whole egg
Dash Orange Bitters

MxMo LIX: Beer Cocktails

Once again it is time for Mixology Monday. This month is being hosted by Fredric over at Cocktail Virgin Slut, and his topic is Beer Cocktails! Taken from his announcement post:

While beer being used as an ingredient in modern cocktails has gotten a lot of press as of late, this is not a new trend. Beer has played a historical role in mixed drinks for centuries. For example, it can be found in Colonial drinks like the Rumfustian, Porter Sangaree, and Ale Flip. While many of these drinks are not seen in modern bars save for craft cocktail establishments, other beer drinks are though, including the Boilermaker, Black Velvet, and Michelada. And present day mixologists are utilizing beer with great success including Kelly Slagle’s Port of Funchal, Jacob Grier’s Averna Stout Flip, and Emma Hollander’s Word to Your Mom. Bartenders are drawn to beer for a variety of reasons including the glorious malt and roast notes from the grain, the bitter and sometimes floral elements from the hops, the interesting sour or fruity notes from the yeast, and the crispness and bubbles from the carbonation. Beer is not just for pint glasses, so let us honor beer of all styles as a drink ingredient.

I for one am a fan of beer cocktails. I have already done a couple of beer cocktails such as Pirate’s Gold and In Flanders Fields. And today I am feeling extra generous so I am going to give you all a two for one special.

For the first drink, my beer element will be incorporated in the form of a beer syrup. I really like using the beer syrup as it can be used as both a sweetener and a bold flavoring element. Beer syrup is essentially a beer reduction with a load of sugar added to it. You can make it from any type of beer, but usually a beer with a distinctive flavor works the best. This particular cocktail utilizes a Belgian Trippel syrup paired with Benedictine. The bold flavor of the demerara rum provides a great backbone as well.

The Dutch Monk
2 oz Demerrara Rum
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/4 oz Beer Syrup


The second drink uses beer as a prominent ingredient. It is rich, flavorful and packs a punch. A base of rye whiskey is coupled with Grand Marnier and orange bitters and topped of by a generous portion of Imperial Stout. The orange flavors of the Grand Marnier and bitters couple very nicely with the rye, as well as the chocolate notes in the stout.

The Outlaw Czar
2 oz Rye Whiskey
3/4 oz Grand Marnier
1/8 oz Orange Bitters
6 oz Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout

So there you have it. Two beer cocktails to quench your thirst. Different styles of beer highlighted in different styles of cocktails. If you are interested in finding more beer cocktails, head over to the Cocktail Virgin Slut in a couple of days and check out the roundup of this months MxMo entries. I’m sure you won’t be disappointed. Cheers!

MxMo LV: Some Like It Hot!

This month’s Mixology Monday is being hosted by Nancy, aka The Backyard Bartender, and her chosen theme is: Some Like It Hot. Very simple, make anything you want, as long as it is hot. This could not have come at a more perfect time, as it has been below freezing this week, and I very much enjoyed experimenting with many variations of hot beverages.

Last week I was enjoying the Full Sail Black Gold, and I thought that with it’s rich chocolate/malt flavors that it would work well in a cocktail. So after thinking about how I was going to incorporate it, I decided to go the beer syrup route and made an imperial stout syrup. It turned out perfectly. Rich and thick with a lot of the chocolate notes I was looking for.

So now I had my sweetener, but what about the rest of the drink? Normally when crafting a drink I start with the base spirit, but since I really wanted to incorporate the beer it was a little more challenging. As I was thinking about flavor pairings, my original thoughts were apples and strawberries, but neither of those really fit with a hot beverage. However, orange would be perfect. Everybody loves those chocolate oranges, so throw some chocolate and orange together, add some rum, and you have got yourself a drink.

It was a good drink, but lacking somehow. Bitters of course, how could one forget bitters? They make everything taste better. Adding some orange and chocolate bitters really helped tame the sweetness and give a little dimension to the drink. So there you have it, a fine winter warmer for those cold chilly nights. Thanks to Nancy for hosting and Paul for organizing month after month. Be sure to head over to her site for the roundup in a few days. Cheers!

Imperial Stout Syrup
3/4 cup Black Gold Imperial Stout
1 cup Sugar
simmer on stove until sugar is completely dissolved.
Cool, and fine strain to remove the beer head.

Pirate’s Gold
1 1/2 oz Jamaican Rum
1/2 oz Demerara Rum
3/4 oz Stout Syrup
1/4 oz Creole Shrub
5 dashes orange bitters
5 dashes chocolate bitters
2-3 oz Hot Water

Beer Cocktails: The Dupont

My next beer cocktail is taken from the brilliant mind of Jamie Boudreau. The beer in this cocktail is actually a beer reduction turned into a liqueur with the addition of sugar and neutral grain spirits. You can find the recipe for Jamie’s beer liqueur on his site.

Dupont Cocktail
2 oz Rye Whiskey
¾ oz Campari
½ oz Beer liqueur

stir and strain into cocktail glass.

This is a great cocktail! The bitterness of the Campari and sweetness of the beer liqueur balance each other out well, while still letting the backbone of the rye whiskey come through. I would bump the rye up by half an ounce for my own tastes, but I’m still getting used to the strong flavors of the Campari. Give it a try and let me know what you think. Cheers!